Good news for Diamond?

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Lou
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Re: Good news for Diamond?

Post by Lou » Sat Jun 16, 2018 3:31 am

If I said there was a 'chute and pointed to the red emergency escape handle, how many passengers (including Mrs. L) would know the difference? 8)
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Boatguy
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Re: Good news for Diamond?

Post by Boatguy » Sat Jun 23, 2018 4:02 am

Unfortunately that would be fraud and the company would be shredded in a lawsuit. But the chute does appeal to the non-flying partners. There is no logic involved, this is all about emotion and perception.
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Carl
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Re: Good news for Diamond?

Post by Carl » Fri Jul 06, 2018 10:06 pm

TimS wrote:
CFIDave wrote:A Cirrus will recover from a spin using its flight controls (perhaps not as easily as a DA20/DA40), but the company never had to demonstrate that during certification because it demonstrated using the parachute for spin recovery. Therefore Cirrus pilots are taught to pull the 'chute to recover from spins.
Actually it was required by EASA. Chute is still more likely to recover and uses less altitude.

Tim
EASA required a rather abbreviated [as compared to FAA Part 23] stall series which I believed they performed in an SR-20. The report is available online. The essence of it was that yes the plane will recover from a stall in a conventional fashion but will not recover simply by releasing the controls as in say a 152.

In contrast, during their certification and in order to comply with FAR Part 23, Columbia had to put their test planes thru over 3,000 stalls in all sorts of configurations-full forward cg, full aft, flaps out, low altitude, FL250-you get the picture. Took nearly two years to perform the testing and come up with an aircraft configuration that met the Part 23 requirements:
Attachments
Lancair Columbia 400 Spin Recovery Testing.pdf
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pietromarx
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Re: Good news for Diamond?

Post by pietromarx » Fri Jul 06, 2018 11:38 pm

Here's a report on the SR-20 spin characteristics: http://www.peter2000.co.uk/aviation/mis ... report.pdf

The key words: "In the case of the SR20, the proper spin recovery procedure is to briskly move the elevator control to the full down position. This is an unnatural control movement, when the nose of the aircraft may already appear to the pilot to be pointing down sharply. This is also a movement not typically advocated by spin training instructors due to associated discomfort. "

Sounds like fun.
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Sandy
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Re: Good news for Diamond?

Post by Sandy » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:25 am

Sounds like fun.
Not at all, especially at low altitude... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEVLqRIqd84 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRXUZnsST5c
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